Magazine

The Anatomy of the EU

Now that Poland has been given the green light to join the European Union people here are asking: what do the various institutions in Brussels, Luxemburg, and Strasbourg actually do? What is the difference between the European Council, the Council of the EU and the Council of Europe, for instance? And why are there only 12 stars on the EU flag? Be confused no longer (hopefully) with our simple guide.

Education in the European Union:

Finding employment is becoming increasingly difficult in Europe. Employers are very demanding and look for staff with good qualifications and sound experience. The European Union is aware of the problem and offers training and education programmes to improve your skills, make your CV more attractive and better equip you for the labour market. In 1997 the Treaty of Amsterdam gave the Union the responsibility to" promote the development of the highest-possible level of knowledge" for the peoples of the Union" through a wide access to education and its continuous updating" .

Globalisation: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

In the late 20th century, "Globalise!" was a catch-cry all over the world - now it's a dirty word. But it's a story of swings and roundabouts, pros and cons...

BackWORDS

There are many uses of the word 'back'. We have selected the most common compound words and phrases used in everyday conversation to help you understand their meanings.

BACKBREAKER - any work or job which causes backaches, such as moving furniture, digging in the garden, etc. " Carrying bricks for the new barbecue was a real backbreaker ." Also," Carrying bricks was real backbreaking work."

BACKLOG - a build-up or accumulation of something, usually work. " When Harry returned to the office after a week's sick leave, he had a huge backlog of work."

Ghosts of Christmas Past

Many of the things that the British and Americans associate with Christmas - the tree, the greetings cards, giving presents - have their origins in Victorian Britain. Lets go back in time and see what Christmas was like for an average family living in London in the mid-eighteen hundreds.

A Memorable Little League World Series

Japan snatched the title from Florida, but to the delight of a 45,000-strong crowd former Little Leaguer U.S. President George W. Bush was in Williamsport, PA in August to watch the Little League Championship Game.

The 2001 Little League World Series will go down in history as one of the most memorable and significant events in Little League's glorious 55 years.

Finally, the Beginning

On 19th May 1999 the USA saw the biggest madness since Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic. " The Phantom Menace" had its opening in over three thousand cinemas across the States. Fans had been queuing for over a month in hot sun and cold rain because the tickets were not sold in advance. The introduction of the film was preceded by hype in the mass media and mass hysteria unseen since the times of Rudolf Valentino. Traders of Star Wars toys were already booking holidays in the Seychelles and ordering new Cadillacs.

Report from a Bloodless War

We all know of the many wars and revolts in Southeast Asia that have resulted in millions of innocent victims. The war that I intend to tell you about is ruthless, too, even if it causes no bloodshed.

The war we are now witnessing is between two languages, French and English. The language of Shakespeare and Churchill is the aggressor, needless to say, whereas French, comfortably established in the region for many years, fights to survive against the odds.

Touching Base

The city of Kutno once more brought together Junior and Little baseball players from Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa (all, oddly enough, included in the European Region!) this July and August, when it played host to three of Europe's most prestigious baseball tournaments - the Transatlantic Regional, the Junior League Regional and the Little League European Regional.

Ancient Traditions, New Worlds

Australia's Aborigines are becoming a strong force in the country's diverse society and culture.

For people right around the world, Australia is synonymous with Aboriginal history and culture. And so it might be a little surprising to learn that Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders make up just 2% of Australia's population - or 353,000 people. For a people so few in number to be so well-known and appreciated internationally says a lot about the strength and vibrancy of indigenous Australian culture.