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Best Wishes for 2004 from Our Publisher

The old year is drawing to a close, and a new one is looming on the horizon. That is the time when we all tend to look back at the preceding 12 months and start thinking about what may lie ahead in 2004. Some of you have been with us for quite some time, others have begun reading The World of English© only just recently, but wondering about the future is something everyone has in common.

The Anatomy of the EU

Now that Poland has been given the green light to join the European Union people here are asking: what do the various institutions in Brussels, Luxemburg, and Strasbourg actually do? What is the difference between the European Council, the Council of the EU and the Council of Europe, for instance? And why are there only 12 stars on the EU flag? Be confused no longer (hopefully) with our simple guide.

Ghosts of Christmas Past

Many of the things that the British and Americans associate with Christmas - the tree, the greetings cards, giving presents - have their origins in Victorian Britain. Lets go back in time and see what Christmas was like for an average family living in London in the mid-eighteen hundreds.

Where there's a Will there's a way

William Wales (aka Prince William) is reaching the end of his first term at St Andrew's University in Scotland, which we profiled last year (5/2000). What's it like trying to be a normal student getting an education fit for a king?

Life can be tough being an apprentice monarch - especially a British one - when the eyes of the whole world are focused on you. And even more so when your mum was Princess Diana, "England's Rose", whose every move and word was examined and blown out of proportion by a sensation-seeking press.

Failure - a winter's tale

Americans and their New Year's Resolutions: as the world grows a year older it's always a good time to change those natural faults that make us human - but it's always a lost cause.

Paradise in East Sussex

For a real taste of old-fashioned England, there's no better place to visit than Rye on (or near enough) the East Sussex coast.

"Jutro jedziemy do Rye'u," I said to my wife (who is Polish, by the way). "Do raju?" she asked. Then I realised that to Poles the name of this little town could well be confused with Paradise. I had never been there before, so I couldn't say whether or not Rye might indeed be "raj". But as it turned out, the little town not far from Hastings came surprisingly close.

Ringing in the Millennium

The Liberty Bell will ring for the first time in over 150 years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the New Millennium.

Saving Asia' s Green Turtles

The Sandakan fishmarket on the east coast of the Malaysian state of Sabah, Borneo, always boasts a huge variety of marine life on sale. Every day, fish, crabs, prawns and squids are brought to the stalls, ready for a buyer. Sometimes you might even catch some vendors selling pingpongballsized eggs eggs laid by the green turtle. These eggs are very rare and always sell out quickly, even though they are sold at RM$1 (current rate US$1.00=RM$3.80) each, an expensive price for a mere egg. Unfortunately, the huge demand also means that the survival of the green turtle is threatened./p>

Best Wishes from the Publisher

Dear Readers,

The year 2001 was the first year of the new decade, new century and new millennium, but our magazine has only just completed its first decade of writing for students and teachers of English as "the universal second language." We began operations in 1992, but only two issues were published that year, so it is 2003 that really marks our 10th birthday. In today's fast-paced times, 1993 may now seem like ancient history. For the benefit of those too young to be with us then, let's recall what things were like back then.

From Rags to Riches

"Charity Begins at Home" or so the old axiom goes. But does it really? For the many homeless of Britain it begins where they live - on the street.

Different countries have different traditions when it comes to charity. Christmas is a time when attention is particularly focused on the notion of philanthropy. In Poland on Christmas Eve many households leave a place set at the table for the lonely or those without a family of their own. How often does the seat get filled? Who can say?